Upper School Applied Science & Engineering

   

Design. Tinker. Innovate.

The Applied Science and Engineering department at Menlo School seeks to develop a deep understanding of core skills and knowledge necessary to be successful in the fields of experimental science and engineering. The courses in this department offer students the opportunity to do real world science and engineering. The predominant mode of learning is by doing. The courses are hands-on and designed to tap into the student’s passions. Students will apply and build upon knowledge learned in their standard math and science classes in the context of exciting and innovative projects. Along the way students will learn essential and practical new skills used in today’s Silicon Valley. Students will learn design, optimization, and tinkering skills. Based in the School’s state-of-the-art Whitaker Lab, students have opportunities to work with cutting edge tools like micro controllers, CAD, robotics equipment, laser cutters, and 3D printers. The courses employ an iterative method of learning while developing curiosity and building critical thinking skills along the way.

Meet our Applied Science & Engineering faculty.

Course Catalog

  • Applied Science Research (H)

    This is a course for students interested in studying advanced topics in engineering and science, students who envision a career in science or engineering, and/or students who are curious about how things work. The first semester students will explore electric motors, atmospheric science, the engineering of space travel and a craftsmanship project. Specifically, students will build a multi-phase electric motor and launch a payload via weather balloon high above the Earth’s atmosphere into space. This course is student centered and student driven. Students have great latitude in their choice of the topics, experiments, and projects. Students will learn the design, prototyping process and how to take and analyze data in order to optimize their projects. Students will also learn how to read and write engineering and scientific papers. In the second semester, they will specialize on one topic of their choice. This can be a research an engineering project or a science project. Possible topics range from what makes a baseball curve, building 21st century prosthetics, green energy projects, to building a Tesla coil to particle physics to your idea. At the conclusion of the 2nd semester each student will write a science or engineering paper and give a final presentation at the Menlo Maker Faire.

    Prerequisites: Complete Physics and Accelerated Chem with a B+ or Conceptual Chem with an A- or get permission from Dr. Dann.

  • Biotechnology Research (H)

    The course provides a unique opportunity for students with self-discipline and a curious mind to learn cutting-edge lab techniques and to put those techniques to use in a major independent project. Class time is spent mostly on hands-on lab work. The first semester involves learning techniques in cell culture, molecular biology, bacteriology, immunochemistry and protein biochemistry, as well as learning to read and write scientific papers. In the second semester, students carry out an independent research project, either here at Menlo or off-campus in an academic or industry lab, by agreement between the student and mentor. As with AP courses, students will continue their work for this class through the first two weeks of May.

    Prerequisites: Complete Chemistry and Biology and pass an application process through Dr. Weaver. Download application form here.

  • Mechanical/Electrical Engineering

    If you like to make things and break things, then this course is for you. If you like to wow and scare the pants off people with your electrical and mechanical inventions, then this course is for you. If you are thinking of being an engineer or just want to see what it’s like to do engineering, then this course is for you. This course is divided into two semesters: one semester is Mechanical Engineering and the other is Electrical Engineering. At the end of the year you will use the skills learned in both parts of the class to develop a final project that will impress, wow, and possibly scare your classmates. The ME semester will provide you with an introduction to engineering with an emphasis on hands-on activities and projects. Topics will include drafting, CAD, dimensioning, tolerances, materials, stress, strain, fasteners, gears, bearings, and other mechanisms. You will be introduced to the engineering design process and you will learn about the role of mechanical engineers in industry. In the EE semester you will learn how to make laser trip wires (laser-photocells), timing circuits, store energy, make electronic switches (transistors), and move things (solenoids and linear motors). In addition, you will learn how to solder, make circuit diagrams and use the laser cutter. Most importantly, in both semesters, you will develop critical thinking and problem solving skills in a real world setting by making cool stuff. There is little nightly homework, but instead it is expected that you put in extra time each week in the lab to work on your circuits or projects. The course will take place in the Whitaker Lab and students will be trained on the majority of the tools in the lab. Students are expected to showcase their projects at events such as the Maker Faire.

    Prerequisites: Completion of Physics with a B or better or by special approval from Mr. Allard or Dr. Dann.

  • Neuroscience

    Interdisciplinary Course: This course combines biology and electronics using a hands-on, scaffolding approach. This approach is three-pronged: (1) perform experiments using electrodes to detect actual neuronal activity in a living system, (2) learn the underlying biology of how that aspect of the nervous system works, and (3) build mechanical and/or electrical models.

    Course Description:

    It is said that understanding the human brain is one of the last frontiers; this course you will take a step toward that goal. You will take an adventure that is thought only possible in fictional writing like Frankenstein and along the way you will learn electronics, experimental techniques and neurobiology. We will explore the fascinating topic of how the brain and peripheral nervous system work by studying the electrical signals that encode neuronal messages, how sensory inputs are detected and how motor outputs are executed, and how the brain processes and creates meaning of your experience.

    By building models, doing experiments and studying the biology you will investigate the following in the first semester of the class:

    How do your sensory neurons collect, encode and transmit information about your environment for you?

    How do your motor neurons get activated and how do they control the contraction of your muscles, allowing you to respond to your environment?

    How fast do signals actually travel within neurons?

    How does the nervous system “tune out” a stimulus that continues for an extended period?

    In the second semester, we will examine:

    How does the brain create your perception of reality?

    How do medicinal and recreational drugs alter neuron function?

    How does learning work and what is memory?

    What is going on when things go wrong (like schizophrenia)?

    Prerequisites: Completion of Physics with a B or better or by special approval from the teachers. This is a junior level course, but sophomores and seniors are welcome.

  • Design and Architecture

    Design…the intersection of form and function…of art and engineering. In this hands-on, project-based course you will learn how to create functional solutions to problems with an aesthetic sensibility. You will learn about Design Thinking and the important role of empathy in solving difficult problems. Creative, qualitative solutions will take precedence over quantitative solutions, and your ability to work with a team and effectively communicate your ideas will be tested. In the second semester the course will transition to architecture. Emphasis will be placed on the major architectural movements of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, and you will learn about the iconic buildings and famous architects associated with these movements. The culmination of the class will be a final project that will incorporate much of what you learned throughout the year.

    Prerequisites: This course is open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.

  • Independent Study: Design Thinking and Tool Safety

    This is a one-semester independent study course that can be taken in the fall or spring semester. This course can also be taken as a one-week course during August before school starts. Students will learn to use all the tools in the AAW lab.

    This would allow the student to be fully tool shop certified before entering an ASE course. The advantage here is that the student will have full access to all the tools right away. In addition to tool certification, students will also be introduced to design thinking as a way to plan their projects. There are only three formal class meetings for the semester plus two check in meetings per month (most likely at lunch). Students are to work on their projects for at least 3 hours per week but can work in the tool shop as best meets their schedule (including the possibility of starting in early August). Students will learn how to safely and properly use all of the tools in AAW, which include table saw, miter saw, band saw, drill press, grinders and laser cutter. The student will learn about and use the various tools in the context of several projects, which they will design and build. At the completion of this course the successful student will be certified to use the various above-mentioned tools. At the end of the spring semester, students will display their creations at the Menlo Maker’s Fair.

    This course is strongly recommended as a pre-requisite for students enrolled in or planning to enroll in Engineering, Robotics and/or Applied Science Research.

  • Independent Study: CAD with Autodesk Inventor Pro

    Ever wonder how parts are designed? Desired to turn an idea into reality? Excited to get a head start on an important skill for your upcoming Applies Science class? Want an awesome industry recognized certificate of proficiency? If you answered yes to any of these, then this independent study may be for you.

    Computer aided design, abbreviated as CAD, is a process of using computer software to design two-dimensional and three-dimensional models. These models can be used in assembly visualization, software based simulations, models used for computer based machining (CNC), and many other applications. Upon completion of the course students will walk away with a good understanding and proficiency of Autodesk Inventor along with design principles that will empower students to create whatever their imagination can come up with. This course will also prep students to take the Autodesk Inventor Certified User exam which is an industry recognized proficiency certification. This course is recommended for students who plan on taking any Applied Science based course in the future.

    Students will use all the skills learned through the study to design and build a unique project to show off their new skills. Students will meet with Mr. Brian Ward throughout the semester to discuss questions and go over progress.

    Pre-requisite: Windows PC or Mac with Windows loaded via Boot Camp (or similar)

    Cost: $100 (for exam fee)

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