Concussion Conference 2015

On Aug. 18, Menlo School hosted a community-based concussion conference focusing on the most up-to-date evaluation and management of mild traumatic brain injuries in youth sports. In association with The Stanford Concussion and Brain Performance Center, The Brain Trauma Foundation and The California Concussion Institute, the conference features some of the nation’s foremost experts.  

The Stanford Concussion and Brain Performance Center

The Brain Trauma Foundation

The California Concussion Institute

Biographies
and presentations

6:00 - Kris Weems, Menlo School Athletic Director of Athletics
Introduction and welcome

6:05 - Steve Young, JD – “Setting the stage: Keeping your head in the game of life. “

6:15 – Jon Cohen, Ed.D - “Defining the problem - Are we at a tipping point?”

6:25 - Eric A. Weiss, MD, FACEP - “When is a head injury a medical emergency? How does the ER evaluate an athlete for a concussion?”

6:40 - Gerry Grant, MD, FACS - “Clinical exam: What to expect in the doctor’s office?”

6:55 – Anthony Saglimbeni, MD - “Managing concussions: Return to Academics and Return to Play”

7:10 - Paul Fisher, MD - “Long-term consequences of multiple impacts and concussions: How many is too many?”

7:25 – Erin Isanhart, PT, DPT, NCS - “Concussion management with Vestibular Rehabilitation”
7:40 – David Camarillo PhD - “Efficacy of helmets, mouth guards and other equipment in prevention of concussions.”

7:55 – Jamshid Ghajar MD, PhD, FACS - “Eye-tracking to detect concussions and guide the return to play/school decision”

Eye-Sync Study

The Stanford Concussion and Brain Performance Center was founded in 2014, and is part of the Department of Neurosurgery at Stanford University’s School of Medicine. The Center is directed by Dr. Jamshid Ghajar, a neurosurgeon whose clinical experience with neurological patients includes those with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and concussion. The center aims to improve outcomes for patients with TBI worldwide; by developing best practice guidelines, conducting clinical research, and educating medical professionals and consumers. The center is at the forefront of concussion and TBI research and is incorporating state of the art eye-tracking tests, EYE-SYNC, in all of its studies. The EYE-SYNC test is administered via customized eye tracking technology, called Dynamic Visual Synchronization (DVS) Goggles.

Stanford University’s Concussion and Brain Performance Center is conducting research into the brain performance of kids ages 12 to 17 year old who play sports. There is no cost, and participants may be paid for their time. The study involves an initial baseline and eye tracking test, and four follow-up visits in the event that the student experiences a concussion. Testing will take place at the student’s school, and administered by Stanford University. Parents do not need to be present.

Based on eligibility you may receive:

  • Baseline test: $15 (45 minutes to 1 hour)
  • Follow up cognitive testing (eye-tracking, reaction times, attention etc.) after a concussion: $130 per visit (2 hours per visit, up to 4 visits)

Please visit braincenter.stanford.edu or call 650.497.7045 or email braincenter@stanford.edu to enroll your child in the study.